N54Tech.com - Your Source for International Turbo BMW Racing Discussion
(#176)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 528
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 09-11-2017, 11:21 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by dyezak
It'll probably be faster for you to pull the whole engine to install all that.
You aren't the first person I've heard this from. I will explore this route since I'm not too pressed on time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by suspenceful
Woo! I think you made the right choice. My 135i is currently a paperweight. Once I save up enough to get a used engine, I think I will tone back my horsepower goals. Although I have all the parts needed, I don't want to grenade another motor.

I look forward to you tackling this project. Be ready for curse words and dirty, bleeding hands. Like noted above, you might have a better time just dropping the engine and trans, or bringing it out from the front.
I believe so too. I was simply getting greedy for a few months considering how I use the car. I believe I'll be much happier with this setup overall. As I mentioned above, I might need to explore the engine dropping/pulling out the front option rather than dropping the subframe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShocknAwe
Very similar power goal wise to me, so I am eagerly anticipating your thoughts on the GCLite/550i/Luk combo.

What fuel are you going for?
I'll be sure to give back detailed feedback every step of the way. As far as fuel goes, I enjoy running E40 and my LPFP/HPFP seem to like it as well, so as long as my HPFP can handle the E40 ratio with the amount of air the GC Lites will be moving, that's probably what I'll stick with. Plus its easy to throw the exact same amounts of E85 and 93 octane in the tank and get pretty close to E40.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 135iam
Nice! I look forward to hearing your review.

Why did you go with the motive fuel rail over buying the complete setup from fuel-it?

I am installing the following in the next two weeks. Mfactory single mass flywheel, spec Stage 2+ clutch, RB next gen +, inlets, outlets.....but I havent made a decision on fueling yet. Planning to focus on getting tuned for 500whp on 93 octane first, wmi or PI may follow shortly after
I found the Motiv rail, injectors, etc. used at a decent price, so I picked that up separately. From there, I added the BMS controller and fuel line to work with my setup. I touched on it above, but that has all been sold. I'll be sticking with DI for the time being.


Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver ACF Top Mount Single Turbo Build Thread HERE
Reply With Quote
(#177)
Old
ianc ianc is offline
Junior Member
 
Posts: 50
Join Date: Jun 2016
Car: 135i
Default 09-12-2017, 11:04 PM

Everything looks gorgeous and I'm ordering bushels of pre-buttered popcorn and cases of beer to settle down and fully take in this extravaganza!

I have to say up front that I'm really happy you abandoned the port injection setup. If the engine can't protect itself by shutting off fuel flow when things are dicey, then things can get hairy and expensive real fast at high power levels. For a track monster and deep pockets fine, but keep it sane and semi-civilized for the DD; especially when you'll be hauling the SO around on occasion. My guess is that once you button this job up, you really won't want to be going there again for a long time. If ever...

Pulling the whole shebang sounds like the best plan to me, but do you need a lift for that? If one's convenient great, but the whole business will come out the front, no?

Best of luck and pulling for you!

ianc
Reply With Quote
(#178)
Old
Schläfer Schläfer is offline
Junior Member
 
Posts: 36
Join Date: Feb 2017
Car: '08 535xi
Default 09-13-2017, 02:52 PM

Which e40 flash are you running now?
Reply With Quote
(#179)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 528
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 09-14-2017, 06:28 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ianc
Everything looks gorgeous and I'm ordering bushels of pre-buttered popcorn and cases of beer to settle down and fully take in this extravaganza!

I have to say up front that I'm really happy you abandoned the port injection setup. If the engine can't protect itself by shutting off fuel flow when things are dicey, then things can get hairy and expensive real fast at high power levels. For a track monster and deep pockets fine, but keep it sane and semi-civilized for the DD; especially when you'll be hauling the SO around on occasion. My guess is that once you button this job up, you really won't want to be going there again for a long time. If ever...

Pulling the whole shebang sounds like the best plan to me, but do you need a lift for that? If one's convenient great, but the whole business will come out the front, no?

Best of luck and pulling for you!

ianc
Agreed completely. I was getting greedy about numbers, but I'll be much happier with this setup on a day to day basis. As you mention, My fiance and I carpool together to work multiple times a week round trip, so this 1er has to adhere to the wolf in sheep's clothing persona with her spending so much time in the passenger seat.

The jackstands, front bumper off, engine/trans out of the front method is definitely the way I'm leaning. I still need to do considerable research on how to make that happen though, but it seems as if it would be most time effective as well.

The thought of being able to install turbos, *********, inlets, clutch/flywheel, clean the intake valves, replace oil pan gaskets with all the room in the world sounds like heaven in comparison to removing the transmission and subframe separately while trying to work in tight spaces.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Schläfer
Which e40 flash are you running now?
I ran the V5 and V7 E40 OTS flashes from MHD for a bit, but for the past few weeks I'm back to the BMS E85 BEF and its definitely the one I prefer the most for overall feel and drivability.


Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver ACF Top Mount Single Turbo Build Thread HERE

Last edited by chadillac2000; 09-14-2017 at 06:34 AM..
Reply With Quote
(#180)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 528
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 02-17-2018, 01:00 PM

Haven't updated this thread in a while, so here goes:

11-05-2017: Since my last post, I've continued to make my 135i work hard nearly every single day. I've made this car live up to the road warrior name, putting nearly 700 miles on it each week and enjoying every second along the way. Each morning with the clutch in and a push of the ignition button, the engine fires right up with no hesitation, releases a quick roar, then quickly settles down to idle because of the Quiet Start mode embedded within the MHD tune. I continue to find this coupe practical, comfortable, quick as hell, and an absolute blast to drive through a number of different driving situations.

I know my driving experience would be greatly enhanced by installing the GC Lite and other mods I have sitting in my spare room, but I still haven't been able to pin down an exact time to start this tedious teardown. In the meantime, my mileage is continuously increasing and that means more maintenance. Not only was it time for an oil change with fresh Motul, but also time for a new set of NGK plugs as its been about 18,000 miles of E40 and 20psi since they were last changed.

Before we get to that, I wanted to share a few purchased I've been meaning to pull the trigger on. I've become less and less satisfied with the hodgepodge of different jacks and jack stands that I have access to at the shared garage I use, so I wanted to grab some new hardware that would be more suited for my setup.



For jack stands I went with Esco 10498 low-profile units with the included large circular rubber jack pads.



For the jack, I went with the Sunex 6602LP 2 Ton, Low Rider Service Jack, which I picked up off Amazon for $217.99. I chose this because of the 2.75" to 24" height range, which would allow me to use it on the 135i and my Cayenne. Regarding the turbocharger replacement that I'm about to undertake, this should allow me to get the car high enough off the ground to comfortably work for a week or two.



Aside from the extreme weight (close to 100 pounds), this jack is impressive and looks phenonemal. Unfortunately, it arrived with no upper handle. Because of the hassle of returning such a heavy item, Amazon instead gave me a 50% refund. I was able to easily replace the upper handle with one off an old jack laying around the garage.



The finishing touch for the Esco stands were these Pivot-Top posts made specifically for the BMW jack pad by Reverse Logic. Now I'll no longer need jack pad adapters or worrying about breaking the pads themselves by destroying them with y-shaped jack stands.





I was a little disappointed to see that the Sunex jack wasn't long enough to fully reach the middle jack point under the engine by itself, but it got impressively close considering this car is lowered with a front lip. Using a smaller jack on one of the front jack pads using an adapter would still be necessary to get the new Sunex jack deep enough under the front bonnet.







I was very satisfied to see the Pivot-Top posts slide smoothly into the jack pads. This height provided ample room for an oil change and the jack stands still have plenty of upward range; range that I'll utilize when swapping turbos.



Sticking to the 5,000 mile oil change interval I've been adhering to lately, the old Motul X-Cess 5W40 oil was drained and replaced with 7 quarts of new Motul X-Cess 5W40, a new Mann oil filter and o-rings, and both catch cans were emptied. Since I drive this car so often, it only takes a few weeks before my Mishimoto OCC + RB external PCV needs dumping. As expected, after emptying the can a few weeks ago, today it was half full again. After 10,000 miles I checked the BMS OCC to find less than a teaspoon of oil coating the inside. I may get rid of that OCC altogether when replacing turbos. After addressing oil concerns, I then turned to the ignition. Eventually the old NGK plugs were out and looked pretty good from front to back. This came as no surprise however, as they've had zero misfires over their life.



In addition to taking out the spark plugs, I also disconnected the injector electrical connections in preparation of performing a compression test--just to ease my mind about my smoking when coming to a stop. I'm fairly positive that the issue stems from leaking turbo seals, but I wanted confirmation there wasn't something more serious going on before I went through the trouble of upgrading to higher flowing turbochargers. For this, I utilized the OTC Deluxe Compression Kit. This was easy to use, had the correct insert, and worked perfectly.



With the engine warm, but not hot, I left the spark plugs out and one by one hand tightened the compression tester in cylinders 1-6. Each time I would go inside the car, depress the clutch, and let the car turn over 10 times. When it was all said and done, my 92,000 mile N54 passed with flying colors.













Afterwards, 6 new NGK plugs were installed and shouldn't need replacing until closer to 110,000 miles (or when I upgrade turbos), whichever comes first.

And while I reinstalled the stock coils with around 25,000 miles of use on them because they were working perfectly at current power levels, reinforcements have arrived for the increased power right around the corner. I'll probably hold on to these and just install everything all at once closer to Spring.



11-08-2017: Not a big update, but ordered a dedicated bracket directly from Mishimoto to secure my OCC connected to the external PCV. I ran it closer to the firewall next to the BMS OCC for a while, but eventually moved it closer to the front headlight. I'd rigged up my own homemade bracket, but liked Mishimoto's in-house polished design better. When installed as originally intended I had some interference with the front inlet, but flipped over and it works perfectly. It gives the can just enough clearance around my inlets, headlights and chargepipe to empty without messing with any of the screws or brackets. Looks loads better too.







12-09-2017: In other news, Asheville got its first snow of the winter months, around 8 inches or so. The 1er, still sleeping outside every night, took it like a champ. This isn't her first time being frozen in place until the snow melts.





Wheel arch shaped icicles.



12-29-2017: As my odometer rolled over 97,000 miles, yet another oil change was in order. It also gave me the opportunity to install the ECS billet oil filter cap I ordered recently. I admit, this was purely for looks. And eliminates one more specialty tool I have to keep in the toolbox. I've always used the BMS oil filter cap tool for removal, but no need with this.



New filter and o-rings in place.



And tightened down to 25 Nm.





Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver ACF Top Mount Single Turbo Build Thread HERE
Reply With Quote
(#181)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 528
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 02-17-2018, 01:01 PM

I apologize in advance for the long post, but I have some catching up to do as I’ve been absent recently! As some of you may know, a while back I picked up a complete set of brand new GC Lite turbos and accessories to replace my smoking stock twins. I had been meticulously planning the install, doing my research, and gathering all the parts needed to make this a smooth DIY. But life suddenly had other plans and I found myself having to put everything on hold indefinitely. These unforeseen circumstances prompted me to return everything I’d purchased over the last 6 months, as well as forfeit the $1,000 discount I’d won through VTT. I was also forced to consider the idea of selling the 135i all together; a car that I’d had all intentions of keeping forever. Over a matter of months though, things began to improve drastically, and not only was I able to keep the 1er as my daily; I was even able to treat her to that freshening up she deserved for all of her loyal hard work lately.

While it hasn’t been that long since I purchased this car back at the beginning of 2016, since then, I have spent a lot of seat time in this thing--to the tune of 50,000 miles in 24 months. Apart from the normal N54 problems, I was able to get out of ahead of most of the issues that typically arise, so ownership had been very enjoyable. More proof that if you take care of these cars with preventative action, they can be extremely reliable without breaking the bank; assuming you can do your own modifications, repairs, and maintenance of course.

It pained me to see my 1er’s mileage exceed 100,000 miles, but that’s certainly just a number in my car’s case though. So many systems have been refurbished and enhanced since taking ownership, that it certainly didn’t reflect its actual age. I finally had the car just where I wanted it on FBO + E85 power levels. It also looked and sounded sensational. It had been a while since I’d bought anything for the car aside from maintenance items and tooling over the past 6 months, so I thought a few upgrades were in order to commemorate the 100K milestone in the form of a few interior and drivability enhancements.

The first present came in the form of a mod that I’d been eyeing for the past year, the Ultimate Clutch Pedal. $295 is excessive for a pedal in my opinion, but it was hard to deny the overwhelming positive reviews I’d read from anyone that had decided to take the plunge and install one. Eventually I gave in and hit “add to cart”.



In addition to the pedal itself, it also came with a few other attachments and shoulder bolts for installation, including their own clutch stop that I’ll be replacing my BMS clutch stop with. The instructions made things simple.



The first step was to remove the bottom dash cover so we could gain access to the pedal fittings. Disconnecting the Bluetooth module from this panel was the most tedious part of the panel removal.



Working under the dash is among the most awkward places imaginable. It takes constant contortion of your body to make things works. Removing the stock clutch pedal was no different. But progressing through the easy-to-understand instructions sheet eventually left me looking like an automatic.



Because I’d installed the BMW Performance aluminum pedal set, I’d need to transfer that one over. Here’s a comparison of the UCP versus the OEM version:



Once I had the aluminum pedal secured to the UCP, all it took was securing the large shoulder bolt and replacing the clip that attaches the slave cylinder to the pedal. After researching as much as I could, I decided to forego the helper spring re-installation. The lack of a helper spring should result in a more linear clutch feel, but takes a bit more effort to engage. A few hours later and things were all reassembled. On to present number 2 of 3.



I loved the thick feel of the M-sport steering wheel, but it was lacking in a few areas; enough that some of other wheels had started to catch my eye despite the high cost. On mine, the perforated leather had become worn at the 7 o’clock position, and the more alcantara I added to the interior, the more I wanted. I wasn’t interested in the electronic readout on some of the higher priced BMW Performance wheels, so that left me with only a few options. Keeping with the BMW Performance theme, the full alcantara model with the yellow 12 o’clock stripe seemed fitting. I already had the OEM alcantara trim insert, so they would match up perfectly. The lack of a heated steering wheel that I’ve had in other vehicles meant that on Carolina winter mornings I was frequently forced to use gloves for the first 15 minutes of my morning commute until things warmed up, so hopefully that helps alleviate the need for those as well.



Removing the stock steering wheel was straightforward. First and most importantly, disconnect the battery. Insert a screwdriver on the slits found on the backside of the wheel, depress the spring clip, and pop out each side of the airbag.



Once the airbag is off, a few electrical connectors need to be disconnected, and then a single 16mm bolt before everything is free.



I swapped over the alcantara trim insert from the original steering wheel, and installed in reverse of removal. I have to admit, that ended up being way easier than I’d anticipated. At this point, I’d eliminated all the M themed components from the car aside from the ZHP weighted knob, something I was hesitant to remove as it held a nostalgic connection to my former E46 M3. I have strong feelings about that car, and running the same shift knob was my way of paying homage to one of my all time favorite vehicles. But my OCD took over and wanted uniformity. That meant a BMW Performance knob with alcantara accents was installed.





At this point the car was equipped with OEM BMW Performance alcantara boots, knobs, trim, and steering wheels. From a purely aesthetic standpoint, the improvement is undeniable.









Initial thoughts are all extremely positive. The steering wheel completely transformed the interior of the car. Grabbing this thing is pure bliss, and although I’ll have to use more care with how clean my hands are when driving, is well worth the enhanced look and feel. It also isn’t uncomfortably cold in the mornings when the temperatures have dropped below freezing the night before. The new knob sits slightly lower than before, and although it takes slightly more effort since it weighs less, fits in perfectly with my interior theme. The Ultimate Clutch Pedal was perhaps my favorite of all three. All the side to side slop has been eliminated. The lower pedal position and included clutch stop, when paired with the lack of a helper spring, just gives a much more precise, linear feel to engaging/releasing the clutch. Now I can immediately find the engagement point and let things smoothly set into motion, where as before with the helper spring, it was much more of a guessing game. I’m surprised removing the helper spring from the stock pedal isn’t done more often. Also, the overall range of pedal travel was nearly cut in half. It just gets I imagine this will help even more when I have a more aggressive clutch installed.



The steering wheel, shift knob and clutch pedal completely transformed the driving experience, but unfortunately did not solve my problem of the cloud of smoke that would envelope my car when coming to a complete stop in traffic that I’d been dealing with for the better part of a year now. At this point, I had a decision to make yet again, as well as some more maintenance items I’d need to address now that I’d crossed into six digit mileage. Should I go with OEM replacements for simplicity’s sake, take the trip back down the upgraded hybrids route, or opt for a well-put together single turbo kit? I eventually made a decision, but you’ll have to wait until later this week to find out.


Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver ACF Top Mount Single Turbo Build Thread HERE
Reply With Quote
(#182)
Old
ucsbwsr's Avatar
ucsbwsr ucsbwsr is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 675
Join Date: Sep 2013
Car: 535xi Wagon
Default 02-17-2018, 01:33 PM

Love seeing an update and love the quality parts used. #details


N54 Powered M5 Wagon:
- M5 Driveshaft, M5 LSD, M5 Axles, M5 Brakes, M5 Rear Suspension
- M5 Front End, M5 skirts, M5 Mirrors, M-Tech Rep Rear
- KW V3, RD Sport Sways, UR Strut Braces, Forgestar F14 SDC
- Manual Trans Swap, MFactory SMFW, Spec Stg 3+ Clutch, UUC SSK
- EOS Port Injection Manifold, Fuel-It: Stg 2 LPFP +Lines +Ethanol Sensor
- JB4, Hexon RR550s, Custom Inlets, AR ***, 3" Exhaust, VRSF 7" IC, ER CP, Tial BOV, RB Ext. PCV, BMS OCC
Reply With Quote
(#183)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 528
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 02-22-2018, 01:19 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ucsbwsr
Love seeing an update and love the quality parts used. #details
Just trying to be like you! Always so envious of your DIY style.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

After much deliberation, reviewing countless threads across multiple forums, and mapping out every step of what was involved with swapping turbos, I just couldn’t overcome the scenario of going through all the labor of replacing my twin turbos with another set of twin turbos only to discover a failure or wastegate rattle shortly down the road. The GC Lites I had in my possession prior may have ended up not failing, but there were multiple confirmed cases of defective turbines within that lineup with no real clarification on what happened. That personally shook my confidence in the whole situation the second go around. A failure of that magnitude after investing the time and money of tackling that type of install would be heartbreaking, and not something I was willing to risk if at all possible. Even if the turbos were warrantied, the labor involved would be incredible, and if they’d failed once, what’s to say they wouldn’t again?

Looking past the twin turbos themselves, silicone inlets and outlets were both areas of concern of mine. The thought of the miserable install associated with 2” driver’s side inlets plus the worry of manifold heat melting the silicone outlets were the straw that broke the camel’s back. Since back when I owned my 535i, I had ambitions of adding a top mount single turbo to an N54 equipped E82, and it was time to make that happen. A twin scroll bottom mount seemed like a nice alternative to going all out top mount, but o2 sensors seemed to be even more at risk and I’d still have difficult reaching the turbo if anything ever needed addressed. Plus when I was shopping, there hadn’t been much long term feedback on any of the newer kits.

After getting in touch with a few different vendors, I eventually settled on a top mount single kit from ACF featuring a Precision 6062 Ball Bearing Gen2 turbocharger (with a polished compressor as the only option). I decided to forego the ceramic coating and recirculated dump ***** to keep costs in check, and because I prefer open dumps and planned on using DEI exhaust wrap anyways. Ultimately I went with ACF because a) I liked the ACF manifold design & ******** sizes the best out of all the top mount kits, b) it seemed to include more robust components more than the Docrace alternative, and c) was slightly more affordable than others with a ball bearing option coming in at less than $5,000. The 6062 configuration with ACF’s proven twin scroll manifold should provide super-quick spool and as much power as my fuel system can throw at it. Plus if things go awry with the turbo, it’s right up top and easily serviceable. Of course single turbos come with their own set of heat problems, but hopefully I can counteract that with carefulness.

Once my mind was made up, Anthony & Payam quickly answered the few remaining questions I had, gave me a two week lead time, and I made payment soon after. ACF has been subject to criticism with how quickly they can get a kit in your hands, but I wasn’t in a huge hurry and had made up my mind to put my faith in Anthony’s ability to deliver. So how accurate was that two week lead time? From the time I made payment to the time it was put in the mail was 21 days. I’m on the other side of the country from Anthony, so including shipping it took a total of 28 days from payment until I had everything in hand and it was well worth it. I’ll let the pictures and video do the talking, but the craftsmanship is truly impressive to see in person.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYN1ezD6zVM





















In the meantime, I had a lot of other areas that I wanted to address and parts I needed to order. First and foremost, was my clutch and flywheel combo. I had managed to take my 135i over the one hundred thousand mile mark (fifty thousand of that tuned on E85 at close to 20psi) and my stock DMFW and clutch were still holding up just fine. Back when I had new hybrids in hand, I had planned on a new DMFW + 335is/550i clutch to keep things simple with a stock feel, but ultimately it was destined to die a quick life at my intended single turbo power levels. I hated the idea of the increased noise and NVH of a SMFW, but hated the idea of misfires even more, so cue up the trusted MFactory Steel SMFW. I was however, curious about the performance advantages of installing a lightweight flywheel and how it affected feel when rev matching. If it was better than the heavy DMFW in that regards, I could come around to enjoy the SMFW idea quickly. The Spec Stage 2+ clutch seemed to be the best bet for a daily driven car around the 550TQ mark, and would last longer than the slightly stronger 3+. Unfortunately, jumping to any of the Spec + options, meant it was a much more expensive setup, but a necessary one. Add in flywheel bolts, pressure plate screws, a brass clutch fork pivot pin, an OEM clutch alignment tool and a service kit with new fluids/plugs, and I was looking at another $1450 on top of the ST kit to transfer all the new power efficiently.

I already had MHD on hand to try and combat the SMFW rattle, so I could raise the idle to counteract this somewhat. In fact, I’d been experimenting with my stock clutch/flywheel by raising the idle to 950RPM for a few months prior. A lot of people are hesitant to do this for some reason, but besides the slightly louder idle decibels, on a 6MT, the car idles smoother and engages the clutch easier as the RPMs aren’t dipping so low. This should in theory make the Spec 2+ easier to engage while eliminating the majority of the unwanted noise.

There was also the issue of single turbo kits and their tendency of killing standard o2 sensors prematurely because of the increased pressure and heat. $425 to avoid these headaches with the ADV o2 sensors. More boost required a 3.5 BAR TMAP + BMS adapter, another $125. My standard 7” upgraded FMIC from VRSF would no longer keep IATs in check during the hot South Carolina summers, so add in the humongous Phoenix Race FMIC, another $500.

It only made sense to do bunch of maintenance items at the same time since I’d be dropping the subframe and have access to some items I wouldn’t normally have access to (and hadn’t done already). These would include: OEM engine mounts (I opted to not go with the 335is or 034 Motorsport versions and just stick with stock), an oil pan gasket & bolts, ******** gasket & bolts, rear main seal, a rear shaft seal for my differential that has been seeping some fluid, oil level sensor o-ring, a fresh set of NGK 95770 plugs and Delphi coils, Motul 5W40 and a Mann filter, a budget walnut blast setup, BMW coolant and new aluminum water pump bolts. Another $860.

Add in an engine support bar, a few specialty tools, the aluminum BMW Performance strut brace for bling that I bought for a decent price on eBay, supplies to heat wrap the ACF top mount kit hot side components properly and my total money spent on going single turbo tallied to more than $9,100 without any custom tuning and performing all the labor myself. The price of going single turbo the right way IS NOT for the faint of heart by any means. I was once told between cheap, fast, and reliable, you can only have two. I chose the two latter options. Here’s my total cost breakdown below, every single penny:

ACF 6062BB Top Mount Single Turbo Kit with polished compressor housing - $5000.00 ACF
ADV o2 Sensors - $425.00 CHRIS
Phoenix Race FMIC - $499.01 N54TUNING
3.5 BAR TMAP Sensor - $89.39 ECS
TMAP Adapter - $32.50 BMS
******** Gaskets - $25.90 ECS
Stainless Tie Wraps - $16.67 AMAZON
DEI Exhaust Wrap - $44.88 AMAZON
6 FT of DEI Heat Protection Sleeving - $52.58 AMAZON
DOCRace Single Turbo Heat Shield - $120.00 DOCRACE
Exhaust Manifold Studs x16 - $15.84 ECS
Exhaust Manifold Nuts x 11 - $38.50 ECS
Exhaust Gaskets - $23.94 ECS
Intake Gaskets - $15.95 ECS
Throttle Body Gasket - $9.89 ECS
335D Intake Duct - $39.68 ECS
Replacement Coolant Pipe & Oil Supply O-rings - $33.51 ECS
MFactory Steel SMFW - $515.36 ECS
Spec Clutch 2+ = $809.10 TOPGEAR
Manual Transmission Service Kit - $42.58 ECS
Clutch Alignment Tool - $25.58 ECS
ECS Clutch Fork Pivot Pin - $34.95 ECS
Pressure Plate Screws - $11.28 ECS
Aluminum Bolt Set for Bellhousing - $10.95 ECS
8 Flywheel Bolts - $22.40 ECS
OEM Flywheel Lock Tool - $53.89 FCPEuro
OEM Engine Mounts & Bolts - $174.98 ECS
Oil Change Kit - $74.44 ECS
Delphi OEM Coils - $278.52 ECS
NGK 95770 - $79.13 AMAZON
BimmerHelp Blasting Attachment & Wand - $68.50 BIMMERHELP
Harbor Freight Walnut Blasting Supplies - $78.78 HARBOR FREIGHT
Amazon Engine Support Bar - $56.99 AMAZON
BMW Coolant/Water Pump Bolts - $35.62 ECS
Rear Crankshaft Seal - $34.61 ECS
Oil Pan Bolt Set - $29.12 ECS
Oil Pan Gasket - $41.21 ECS
Rear Shaft Seal - $12.25 ECS
Oil Level Sensor O-Ring - $6.39 ECS
Redline Power Steering Fluid - $11.49 ECS
OEM BMW Performance Aluminum Strut Brace - $150.00 EBAY
TOTAL = $9,141.36

To put that in perspective, I could probably buy a 335i in decent condition for that kind of coin. That also means on top of the $5,000 cost of the complete single turbo kit, it took over $4,100 in accompanying mods to get everything else up to par in my eyes, and I already had a decent amount of those components necessary to go single turbo installed prior to all of this like the JB4 + MHD, stage 2 LPFP, upgraded charge pipe, Tial BOV with upgraded vacuum source, Index 12 injectors, etc. I can probably net close to $1,500 from selling my existing twin turbo setup parts to help offset costs somewhat, but is still an enormous investment. So what does dropping over nine thousand dollars on your N54 equipped ride get you? A lot, actually.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xhZ7qdlG1as





Before I began to totally tear the car apart for the extraordinary amount of work I was about to embark on, I thought it would be beneficial to have some baseline readings. Just a few weeks earlier I’d discovered that there was small performance shop just a few miles away equipped with a Dynojet. It only made sense to make an appointment and get some baseline numbers on the stock twins.



It only took getting into boost once before we realized we needed to add a few extra straps.



These two runs were on E40 fuel on the E85 BMS BEF on map 7. My poor, tired, and smoking turbos were targeting around 19.7psi for both runs, but were only managing to hit around 17psi and tapering off to around 14psi near redline. As instructed by Terry over on N54Tech, these runs were done in 4th gear from 2,000 to 7,000 RPM. Smoothing is set to 5. I did notice where correction was set to SAE, instead of the STD Terry suggested.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhv5j1pyhO8

Run 1 was the run I spun the tires, run 2 resulted in 395HP & 406TQ, run 3 resulted in 393HP & 407TQ.





I drove the car straight back to the garage where the single turbo conversion and got to work. I already had all the new parts to go in, as well as all the tools I’d need, neatly laid out. I started with a wide open space so I could sprawl out a bit.



Using the impressive Esco jacks I recently picked up, I was able to get the car high up off the ground, since I’d be spending plenty of time underneath it over the next few weeks. And because I wanted to use a creeper, so some extra clearance was needed.





Back in the summer of 2016 as the 135i was about to turn over 60,000 miles, I was forced to replace the aging Michelin Pilot Sport tires that I bought the car with. Because I drive my car so much, longevity was just as important as performance for me. I spent a few days digging through TireRack reviews before deciding on the 235/265 Hankook Ventus V12 evo2 combo with a 320 treadwear rating. Over the next 18 months and 42,500 miles, I put these tires through the ringer as they took on daily driving duties in every condition imaginable: 100+ degree summers, torrential downpours, 10 degree winters, snow-covered side roads, spirited driving through mountain twisties, and multiple 400+ HP/TQ pulls on dry pavement. Usually when tires last this long, they don’t do much for performance, but Hankook was able to find a very nice happy medium with these. Maybe it’s a testament to my suspension, wheel/tire setup, alignment, and driving style, but the wear pattern on the front and rears were pretty even across the board. The fronts probably had 10,000 miles left of life in them.



My only complaint would be when running lower pressures, these did seem to flatspot when left sitting for a few days that would take a few minutes of driving to clear up. Near the end of the life of the tires, the old TPMS also began to show up as inactive from time to time and the impending warning code was driving me crazy. When it came time to start searching for replacements, and new TPMS sensors, I was very tempted to just repurchase another set of the V12 evo2s, but another tire claiming an even better 340 treadwear rating and garnering a lot of praise online ultimately won me over: the Firestone Firehawk Indy 500s. I ordered the same 235/365 sizes as before, and as they always do, Tire Rack had them in my possession within a few days. Luckily I was able to stretch the life of my previous Hankooks out until this single turbo teardown, so I can have the old tires taken off and the new ones mounted/balanced in the meantime. I also prefer to take off the wheels myself, and mount them back to the vehicle myself once the new rubber is installed. The more I can reduce the amount of times someone other than me wrenches on my car, the better, especially with stuff I don’t want terribly over-torqued or scratched up. I can’t wait to stop staring at these and actually get them mounted up.



Since I knew I was going to be installing the massive Phoenix Race FMIC that requires a lot of cutting of the plastic front shroud, off came the front bumper. Now I had a full view of the existing 7” VRSF FMIC I’d been running for the past year or so.



Out came all the lower splash guards, plastic intake ducting out, and radiator fan so I could gain access to the t-bolt clamps on the FMIC.



After loosening the t-bolt clamps and removing the two aluminum screws holding the FMIC in place, it dropped out easily. Now I was ready to start unbolting some of the components in the engine bay to gain full access to the intake valves as a walnut blast was the first order of business.



The Mishimoto OCC hooked up to the RB external PCV in order to remove the front inlet, charge pipe and air filters.



Strut bars, BMS OCC, throttle body and all associated intake piping removed.



Vacuum canisters gone, front MMP inlet out.



At this point, it was time to remove the studs and bolt holding the intake manifold in place so I could take a peek at my valves. As I had seen back in late 2017 when I removed the manifold to tap for a larger vacuum source, the valves were fairly gunked up despite the external PCV, but as Rob mentioned, the buildup did seem to be more evenly distributed and probably far less than what it could have been. Not to mention my turbos had been pushing oil for some time. Please excuse my poor photos. I have never been able to get great pictures of my valves using the DSLR. so had to resort to strange lighting and the iPhone X camera.













After noting the condition of each port, I started to assemble the supplies that I’d gathered to try my first walnut blast. In the past I’d used liquid and brushes, but it took forever and was messy. I already had a large air compressor on hand, and after checking out Jake’s video, it seemed easy enough to do the right way. And cheap. You can find all the supplies you need, plus a DIY on the video below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnjeq715wKM&t=0s

Ready to blast!



I used the remote starter to get the cylinder 1 valves closed and taped off all the others.



The Bimmerhelp 3D printed insert fit perfectly and seems durable.



I loaded up the blaster with walnut shells, turned on the vacuum, attached the feed tube and air hose, and began blasting. After letting the walnuts flow for about 30 seconds, I assessed what everything looked like, used a pick to dislodge some of the still remaining gunk, blasted for another 30 seconds, and this is what cylinder 1 looked like after. Rinse and repeat for cylinders 2-6.



Taking a few days off, and then I’ll be back at it this weekend getting the old clutch, flywheel, and turbos off the car in preparation for installation of the shiny new hardware.


Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver ACF Top Mount Single Turbo Build Thread HERE
Reply With Quote
(#184)
Old
suspenceful's Avatar
suspenceful suspenceful is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 683
Join Date: Mar 2014
Car: 2008 BSM 135i
Default 02-22-2018, 03:42 PM

NICE! Glad you see you're following my YouTube videos (as if you couldn't already tell by our build similarities, haha!)


2008 BMW 135i 6MT - Doc Race Single Turbo 6266
749whp/643wtq @ 29psi, weighs 3260lbs


YouTube build: youtube.com/jakespence135
Instagram updates: instagram.com/jakespence
N54 t-shirts, etc: bimmerstreet.com
Reply With Quote
(#185)
Old
1and1 1and1 is offline
Junior Member
 
Posts: 31
Join Date: Jul 2016
Car: '09 135i
Default 02-22-2018, 04:43 PM

Worth doing the drive shaft flex joint while you have all that apart? It's another ~$75 depending on where ya get it

I'm recalling that you did trans mounts already?


1and1
135i - E82.N54 2009 BSM - MHD S1 / xHP S2 / WL RSFI, Koni Street & Eibach Pro-Kit springs / EBC Red's & Firehawk 500's
X1 - E84.N20 2013 MGM - JB4 - The Wife's
Reply With Quote
(#186)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 528
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 02-23-2018, 08:39 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by suspenceful
NICE! Glad you see you're following my YouTube videos (as if you couldn't already tell by our build similarities, haha!)
I've told you before, but your car was definitely what got me interested in the 135i and has obviously inspired a lot of aspects of my build. You're always seemingly 6 months ahead of schedule compared to my 1er, which means you're usually in the middle of what I'm still in the planning stages of. I'm definitely digging the new YouTube videos, and found the walnut blasting one very helpful when referencing it a few days ago!

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1and1
Worth doing the drive shaft flex joint while you have all that apart? It's another ~$75 depending on where ya get it

I'm recalling that you did trans mounts already?
I've wavered on whether or not to replace the guibo. When I pull the driveshaft this weekend, I'll assess what it looks like and order one if need be. I think there are even some upgraded versions I may need to look into.

Yes on the transmission mounts. I'm currently running the ones from Rogue Engineering and highly recommend them.


Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver ACF Top Mount Single Turbo Build Thread HERE
Reply With Quote
(#187)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 528
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 02-25-2018, 11:55 PM

With the walnut blast in the books and my intake valves looking minty, it was time to dedicate the weekend to ripping out all the old twin turbo components I would no longer need, as well as address a few maintenance items I would have easy access to. To begin, the mid ***** would need to come out. As well some heat shielding before we'd have access to the driveline pieces.



A clear shot of the 6MT transmission still in place right before I started removal.



Since they'd need to come out anyways and would make more room for the bellhousing bolts, I decided to remove the ********* next.



This revealed a glimpse of the front turbo that would be coming out later.



A few minutes later and the front and rear MMP inlets were out. They had held up fairly well, but had some cuts and bruises from installation the first time around in those tight spaces.



I followed a few different YouTube DIY videos to get a good overview of what was involved in changing the clutch on the N54, so I had a good idea of where the bolts were situated. An array of long extensions and swivels made quick work of the lower bell housing bolts, and because I had removed the rear inlet completely, I was able to remove the three bolts on top from under the hood with room to spare.



Unfortunately I did not have an extra set of hands around, so I spent the next hour carefully removing the transmission from the car myself. What a workout. I was impressed to see the clutch and pressure plate were still in pretty good condition.



Because I didn't have an extra set of hands, I'm glad that I had the flywheel lock tool so I was able to break loose the 8 flywheel bolts by myself.



While the clutch and pressure plate seemed to be in good working order, the dual mass flywheel had seen better days. To be honest, I've thought the DMFW was noisy from day 1, but this is probably why.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugJRvaSOUUg

Now it was time to start focusing on the fluids and remaining components between me and the turbos starting with steering. It took patience to remove the steering rack and and all the electrical connections dealing the with the active steering system, and a lot of rags to clean up all the power steering fluid, but eventually the whole rack was removed and sat aside. Then the sway bar. Then the rest of the suspension components still hanging on to the subframe, until there were none left.

I knew that I wanted to wait to reinstall the transmission until nearly the end of this install, so that required some more robust bracing than simply the Harbor Freight support bar I originally opted for. I used that, along with the tow hook installed in the engine, as well as another support bar I welded up closer to the firewall, and secured with straps for more stabilization once the subframe was dropped out.







Once that was in place, just a few big bolts and the subframe was out, leaving us with a pretty nice view of the twin turbos.





Next up was to drain the coolant. I started with the radiator drain plug, letting as much release as possible, but I’m not naive. I’ve drained coolant on this car before, so I was aware I’d be in for a bath when releasing the drain point closer to the water pump. As expected, I was a wet, sticky mess by the time I wrestled off the water pump and thermostat I’d put on last year. I went ahead and removed the coolant reservoir from top as well.



This allowed for easy access to the small v-bands holding on the stock oulets. With that pipe, along with the boost solenoids and heat shield removed, I finally got a full look at the upper part of the exhaust manifolds and was taken back by the condition of the original nuts.



I had Kano Kroil and stud extractors on hand, but somewhat expected the worse given their visual appearance. While I worried about the rusted manifold hardware, it was time to dump the motor oil. For the first time I decided to collect a Blackstone sample and send it in. I’ve been wanting to for a while, but never could manage to remember to submit a request for a collection kit until recently. We’ll see how my Motul is looking at 5,000 miles, but I’ll more than likely switch to 3,000 mile changes going forward with the new single setup.



Comfortably sitting undeneath the car on my creeper with all the room in the world, I began using extensions, swivel sockets, a deep 11mm socket, and the appropriate sized torx socket to slowly work through the manifold nuts, studs, oil feed/drain bolts, coolant bolts, until everything was free. I didn’t hit one snag with any of the old hardware coming off and didn’t need to resort to any stud extraction or even oil soaking, but then again I took my time and had the right tools.

I will say, that if I had been re-installing twin turbos back into the car, I would have been forced to order new drain and feed lines. 5 of the 6 were so adhered to the block and water pipe that they were deformed by the time I got them dislodged. Ironically enough, the only one that survived is the oil drain for the front turbo that I'll be reusing.

And the moment I was waiting for all weekend.



Confirmation that this rear turbo was pushing oil and the root of my smoking issue. I also noticed while the turbo was still attached to the car that the clip holding the wastegate rod was missing. You’ll notice in the picture, it’s actually come undone completely.



What a welcomed sight after a weekend of removing filthy parts and getting splashed by a plethora of different fluids.



But I wasn’t ready to call it a night just yet. I wanted to get the oil pan gasket and oil level sensor o-ring replaced, so that meant we needed to remove the power steering pump in order to access all the oil pan bolts.



Once that was removed, I quickly backed out all the aluminum bolts holding on the pan.



I removed the oil level sensor, and thoroughly cleaned the entire oil pan, as well as all surrounding surfaces on the bottom of the block before reassembling everything and preparing the new gasket + bolts for installation.







The rear main seal wasn’t giving me any problems yet, but I definitely wanted to swap it out for a new one considering I had over 100,000 miles and was staring right at it. Using a seal tool, I was able to pull the old seal out.



And install the new one.



Before I left, I also took the time to install the brand new manifold studs I ordered. While some said it wasn’t mandatory, in my case, using new studs/nuts was absolutely necessary.





Later this week, it’ll be time to start installing some of the new and exciting pieces that will be replacing all the stock stuff I just took off. Already, what a labor intensive job. I’ve been taking my time, enjoying myself, documenting, and doing some extra curriculars like intake valve cleaning, but I already have over 20 hours in this project so far and haven’t even installed anything yet.


Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver ACF Top Mount Single Turbo Build Thread HERE

Last edited by chadillac2000; 02-26-2018 at 09:37 AM..
Reply With Quote
(#188)
Old
Bryce 135i Bryce 135i is offline
Junior Member
 
Posts: 53
Join Date: Oct 2016
Car: 2008 135i
Default 02-26-2018, 08:06 AM

Are you worried about the engine internals at all with the big single turbo? I know the crank, rods and pistons are tough but are they going to hold up to this set up? I would like to go this same route one day as well with my 135 but the internals are what concern me. Also do you plan to do a LSD on the car?
Reply With Quote
(#189)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 528
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 02-26-2018, 08:48 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryce 135i
Are you worried about the engine internals at all with the big single turbo? I know the crank, rods and pistons are tough but are they going to hold up to this set up? I would like to go this same route one day as well with my 135 but the internals are what concern me. Also do you plan to do a LSD on the car?
The internals on the N54 are pretty stout. There are plenty of guys running anywhere from 600-800 WHP on these motors without much effort. My measly goals of 550-575HP, with all the supporting mods in place, should be pretty simple to run reliably.

An LSD is definitely something I want, and will probably need after this swap. Maybe later this year or in 2019.


Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver ACF Top Mount Single Turbo Build Thread HERE
Reply With Quote
(#190)
Old
Bryce 135i Bryce 135i is offline
Junior Member
 
Posts: 53
Join Date: Oct 2016
Car: 2008 135i
Default 02-26-2018, 04:09 PM

Nice! I want to do the single swap on my car for sure. Just need to save up some $.
Reply With Quote
(#191)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 528
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 02-27-2018, 09:16 AM

Last night I spent some time familiarizing myself with the dual Tial MVS wastegates, MAC solenoid with PNP harness, and stainless lines that ACF provides so I'd know how everything was oriented. I decided to go with the green/white spring combination based on other people's experiences and Payam's suggestion.



Getting the top of the wastegate installed was no easy task. If my fiance hadn't been able to thread the allen head bolts in while I kept A LOT of pressure on the cap/springs, I would have to resort to a vice.



Using Payam's pictures, I was able to mock up the included NPT/AN fittings and SS lines to where they'll be situated when installed on the manifold. The two fittings in the middle that aren't installed yet are the straight through NPT/AN that fits to the oil feed on the block, and the 45 degree NPT/AN that fits on the compressor housing.

Not that it matters all that much, but I love how the TIAL MVS wastegates match my existing Tial BOV.









New hardware starts going on tomorrow.


Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver ACF Top Mount Single Turbo Build Thread HERE

Last edited by chadillac2000; 02-27-2018 at 09:23 AM..
Reply With Quote
(#192)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 528
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 03-01-2018, 12:55 PM

Yesterday brought more progress on the single turbo conversion. Before I began installing any of the hot parts, I wanted to address the windshield wiper fluid fill neck that sits in an unfortunate part of the engine bay for top mounts. At least there's a viable option for relocation with only a little effort. This includes removing the passenger side front rear wheel well to unveil the full neck.



There's an oval sized hole that feeds up to the cowl drain port, which the filler tube will go up through with some force. Don't do like I did, and remove the filler neck while it's full of wiper fluid. As soon as it came through the engine bay into the wheel well, I was doused in nearly a gallon of wiper fluid. Not a great start to the day.



Eventually you'll see the filler neck pop up in a much better place for top mount heat, that's still fully accessible.



And with the cap on. I'll get some more pictures regarding access when the cowl and covers are re-installed to see how easily this will be to fill on the go. Now that I won't ever have to deal with a melted filler neck, it was time to move on to installing some of the smaller, hard to reach items that need to be bolted down before moving on to the larger stuff.



That included the aluminum coolant pipe (you can reuse your OEM gasket, but I bought a new one for peace of mind), two coolant plug fittings (also bought new o-rings for this, but my old ones looked fine), an oil feed fitting (new o-ring here too), and freeze plug for the rear oil drain. We'll be cutting and reusing the front drain tube (w/new o-ring) from the OEM turbos to use as the drain fitting for the single turbo.







I started with the freeze plug to cap off the rear oil drain from the OEM twin turbos. I used a very thin layer of max temp copper RTV silicone and found a socket that fit around the outer ring, NOT the inner recessed portion. A few hits with a rubber mallet and the install had officially commenced.



Working in a clockwise motion, the next up was the old coolant feed on the top left of the crankcase. This is the longer of the two coolant blocks in the kit. I reused the stock bolts, but as I mentioned, used new o-rings all around on these fittings. I used these torque settings for all bolts during this process.





Next was the old coolant feed on the top right of the crankcase. Same process as the other side. This is the shorter of the two coolant blocks in the kit.



Then on to the oil drain return for the front OEM turbo, remember, we already plugged the other one. This is where the OEM drain line that we cut earlier will be reinstalled. Again, reused the stock bolt and a new o-ring. It's not included in the picture, but I went ahead and trimmed 6" of the included heater hose in the kit, secured it to the cut oil drain, and tightened the included hose clamp properly so it would be ready to drop the hard oil drain line down into once we get the center cartridge of the turbo installed later.



Moving on to the center of the crankcase, we use the last of the fittings included in the ACF ST kit for the oil feed. Prior to installing you'll want to install the straight through NPT to AN fitting ialso included in the kit. As I did with all the NTP connections when mocking up the wastegates, use teflon tape to ensure a proper seal.

Once that's installed, the included ACF coolant pipe is installed using 4 new included bolts. It's okay to reuse the stock gasket for this pipe (mine looked fine), but I bought a new one and used it instead.





Before moving on to the manifold, I went ahead and attached the included heat shielded oil feed so it would already be in place.



Now on to the heart of this install: Anthony's tubular manifold.

Unfortunately the beautiful welds were no longer visible because I wrapped the manifold and ******** with DEI titanium heat wrap. This was no easy task using stainless steel clamps. This was my first time using these, and getting them as tight as you'd like is simply not possible. Combined with the hard to reach places in the tight bends, what I thought would be an enjoyable experience of wrapping all the pieces became a frustrating project in itself.

I also grabbed my 6 brand new exhaust manifold gaskets, my 11 new OEM nuts, 5 shorty nuts included by ACF, the v-band clamp for the two manifold pieces, and some max temp copper RTV. And Payam's video for reference on cued up on the iPhone.



New gaskets on--nice and tight.



Here are the locations where you'll want to use the shorty nuts included by ACF. All of the other studs will accept OEM nuts with this manifold. Nearly half of the nuts are pretty hard to access, so be very patient with this part. The last thing you want is a stripped nut with no way to get it off, or an installed manifold that isn't seated properly.



And this is the torquing sequence I used:



With the subframe out, the front bank 1 manifold fits in easily, followed by the rear bank 2 manifold. Secure a few of the nuts, just so the manifolds don't slide off as we'll want to tighten the large v-band before moving on to the manifold to crankcase connections. Put a nice layer of RTV on the v-band, and tighten it down. Then move on to torquing down the manifold.

A few things here: the exhaust manifold gaskets will seal as they are tightened down, this means some bolts that have already been torqued will need to be re-torqued as they may have gained some additional clearance as others were being tightened. I triple checked every nut--making sure the ones that I could get a torque wrench on were properly torqued down, and the ones I couldn't, were as tight as the others. ALSO, trim your stainless steel ties holding the manifold wrap on properly and fold back on itself so no sharp edges are exposed. I look like I climbed over a razor wire fence this morning because I did not do this.

Eventually you'll have something that looks like this:



And finally a glimpse of light at the end of the tunnel.



I knew space was going to start shrinking quickly, so I wanted to go ahead and see how the DOCRace heat shield would fit. So far so good. Fingers crossed that the big ******** will squeak through, as it provides a good bit of protection; and looks great installed.



After checking everything again, now it was time to mock up the twin Tial MVS wastegates that I had mocked up on the table earlier. Using Payam's pictures from his install thread, I situated them accordingly.



I kept the v-band connections just loose enough to be able to adjust them when installing the dump tubes, but made sure to arrange the v-bands so I could access them for tightening later. I went ahead and got the stainless wastegate lines with AN fittings in place as well.



While I still had full access, I went ahead and grabbed the ADV o2 sensors and tightened them down. Perfect fit and hopefully will prevent any o2 related issues commonly seen on ST N54 builds.





I spent the next hour or so fumbling with the open dump tubes only because I didn't have a helper. Not having an extra set of hands made for a lot of frustration trying to fit these. From underneath for example, the long pipe has to be raised up in an area with tight clearance, so getting a v-band clamp on properly and the bolt & nut secured is no easy feat! I pressed onwards however and eventually had both of the dump tube connections seated properly and hand tightened.

Using the old passenger side motor mount assembly to check clearance, I mocked up the dump tubes to impersonate the double barrel shotgun seen in Payam's picture:



Once I got things to my liking, I got to work on tightening down the 4 v-band connections connecting to the wastegates to the manifold and the wastegates to the dump tubes. I then went back and RECHECKED EVERYTHING AGAIN. This manifold dump tube combination is impressive visually. I imagine it will only look better with the ********.

At this point, I'd been at the garage all day, and my dog was ready to leave a long time ago, but I'd gotten too far not to mock up this at least the exhaust housing.



Before actually disassembling the turbocharger, I knew I wanted to use some of the DEI heat sleeve on the two wastegate lines running between the two wastegates themselves, which are located pretty close to the manifold. Probably not necessary, but again, this car is a daily driver and I'm trying to minimize issues.



After taking off the 1/2 inch bolts attaching the hot side of the turbo to the center cartridge, I carefully pulled away the cartridge and cold side of the turbo and sat it aside. I grabbed the four new bolts included in the kit, the twin scroll gasket I picked up separately, and attached the 0.82 A/R housing. This is smaller than the 1.0 A/R housing used on a lot of single turbo builds, so it provided a bit more breathing room in the tight spaces.



The clearance between the exhaust housing, inner fender and strut tower should perfectly accommodate the included turbo blanket, as well as hold in place securely.



I used the rest of the DEI heat sleeving on the hard brake line, and inconveniently located AC line (partly rubber) that will be located just above the ******** that isn't protected by the factory heat shielding. I have another 6 feet of sleeve that I may use on the bank 2 o2 sensor wiring, as well as some of the oil drain/feed lines. Again, just for added protection, not because it needs it. Payam has been running these top mount kits for many miles using minimal heat protection at all with no issues to report.

Now we just have a straight shot for the ******** to feed down through.



I plan on spending another full weekend on the car, so by the end of Sunday I should be getting pretty close to having everything properly buttoned up.


Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver ACF Top Mount Single Turbo Build Thread HERE
Reply With Quote
(#193)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 528
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 03-04-2018, 07:53 PM

Moving right along, it was now time to attach the compressor housing to the exhaust housing that was already mounted in the car, but first it needed some of the included fittings attached. Take note of the hard oil drain line that will be routed down past the manifold and into the OEM drain + heater hose already in place.



No need for a traditional gasket with this design.



Oil drain and oil feed fittings installed and ready to be separated from the compressor cover. The heat shielded oil feed line is already attached at the crankcase and routed to the top of the engine bay, ready to be hooked to the compressor housing.





The most frustrating part of this step was how long it took to tighten all the bolts that secure the compressor housing to the exhaust housing. I had to grind down a wrench to make it thin enough to get to one of the bolts tucked down in a hard to reach place, but eventually it was fully tightened down with the oil feed and drain connected. I also went ahead and fitted the exhaust housing blanket just to get an idea of how tight it would be.





The drain angles towards the engine, letting gravity do most of the work, and the hardline should keep it protected from the heat.



Water pump and thermostat back in, with all hoses reconnected except the one rerouting back to the coolant reservoir that I'll be relocating to the driver's side. I went ahead and used some DEI heat shielding sleeve around the 6" or so of heater hose I have connecting the hard line to the OEM cut oil drain so it's also protected from any unnecessary heat.



Before installing any more hardware I wanted to get the subframe and transmission in place so the engine would be angled properly for final assembly of the compressor housing and ********. I decided to use new OEM motor mounts with new bolts and mounting nut when reinstalling everything.





Some time later and with the help of multiple floor jacks, I had the subframe + motor mounts in place and torqued down.



The open dumps ***** look mean peeking out past the frame.



With the subframe back in place, I then turned my attention back to the transmission. The rear main seal was already seated in place, so I grabbed the MFactory steel SMFW, 8 new flywheel bolts, and my lock tool. This is after everything has been torqued down and wiped down in preparation for the clutch. As described, this is noticeably lighter and more simplistic than the DMFW.



I quickly ditched the included Spec alignment tool for the OEM BMW tool.



Pressure plate installed and torqued down with 6 new bolts.



I had also had a few things to take care of with the transmission itself. It hadn't been that long since I'd done a transmission fluid change, but I went ahead and did another with new fill/drain bolts while it was out of the car. Next was to swap out some of the old, dirty hardware.



Spec includes a new throwout bearing and pivot arm, and I also picked up a brass pivot pin from ECS.





The last piece to be added prior to reinstallation was the aluminum guibo I purchased to replace my rubber version, however my OEM one looked fine even with the high mileage.





Multiple hours later, and using the same floor jacks that I used when installing the subframe, the transmission was in place and torqued down properly with new bellhousing bolts. The driveshaft was reconnected, and center bearing support in place. I was thoroughly exhausted after doing this all myself, but it is doable solo with the right tools and some patience.

When I get some more time with the car, I'll continue with the cold side piping and FMIC. The Phoenix Race FMIC I purchased had some unsightly overspray on the front, so I just applied a light coat of black to make everything uniform that's visible. A quick test fit showed me that this massive front mount will require quite a bit of cutting of the plastic shrouding.



Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver ACF Top Mount Single Turbo Build Thread HERE

Last edited by chadillac2000; 03-05-2018 at 08:52 AM..
Reply With Quote
(#194)
Old
foued1984's Avatar
foued1984 foued1984 is offline
New Member
 
Posts: 8
Join Date: May 2017
Car: BMW135I
Default 03-05-2018, 05:02 AM

Good work


BMW E87 SWAP N54 DCT JB4 anti lag 7"FMIC DPF 450lpfp MMP PI BMS PI CONTROLLER MMP inlet outlet N20 TMAP AEM progressive WMI
Reply With Quote
(#195)
Old
suspenceful's Avatar
suspenceful suspenceful is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 683
Join Date: Mar 2014
Car: 2008 BSM 135i
Default 03-05-2018, 12:51 PM

Great progress! But you NEED to reclock that turbo. Oil feed needs to be on top, dead center.


2008 BMW 135i 6MT - Doc Race Single Turbo 6266
749whp/643wtq @ 29psi, weighs 3260lbs


YouTube build: youtube.com/jakespence135
Instagram updates: instagram.com/jakespence
N54 t-shirts, etc: bimmerstreet.com
Reply With Quote
(#196)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 528
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 03-05-2018, 01:21 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by suspenceful, post: 34999, member: 1291
Great progress! But you NEED to reclock that turbo. Oil feed needs to be on top, dead center.
VERY MUCH APPRECIATED YOU POINTING THIS OUT--can't believe I overlooked that as I hooking it up. It must have been way too late and I had too little sleep when I mounted that up. Was the last thing I did before heading home late late Saturday night. This is the reason I wanted to be very transparent with this upgrade; so people could point out my mess-ups!

I will remove and reclock properly. The last thing I need is an oil/feed drain problem after all this.


Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver ACF Top Mount Single Turbo Build Thread HERE
Reply With Quote
(#197)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 528
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 03-13-2018, 01:13 PM

Between my last post and this one, I received back my Blackstone oil analysis. This was my first time using their service, but probably will do so in the future with the new ST setup and 3,000 mile OCIs. The 5,000 mile interval (ends up being every few months in my case), was confirmed to be in good standing along with signs of a healthy engine. Good news for all the money that I just dumped into this car.



Upon returning to the garage, my first order of business was getting this turbo clocked properly. Once I had everything in front of me again, I realized that I had clocked the compressor housing at a bit of angle because I was forced to due to the bank 1 wastegate sitting directly below. Talking strictly manifold design, this seems to be the best option for wastegate placement, but also adds some more precise fitment into an already tight situation. With some patience and a little help via text from Payam, I removed the water pump and thermostat (this time with the subframe installed) to gain access to the hard oil drain for some adjustments.

It took about an hour of tinkering with the wastegates, dump tubes, and v-band clamps to get them in the correct orientation where the hard oil drain line could snake past the manifold and wastegate to perfectly mate up with the oil drain up of the compressor housing; now sitting directly at the 6 o'clock position for easy draining. Once this was adjusted correctly, everything suddenly fit much better, so I went ahead and re-installed the large orange o-ring for the turbo and fitted the polished compressor housing, silicone coupler, charge pipe feeding down to the inlet of the FMIC, and tightened the v-band clamps once they were oriented properly.



On the bench, I realized that with the BMS shorty filter, there was going to be some interference with the compressor cover port that the MAC solenoid would be connected to. With a straight NTP to AN connection, there wasn't enough clearance, with a 90 degree NTP to AN, there wasn't enough clearance to thread the fitting in, so a 45 degree fitting installed at the right angle was needed to make everything fit to my liking.



From there, the hard SS lines of the ACF kit could be connected while still allowing the BMS shorty filter to fully seat. I also went ahead and tightened down all the AN fittings and mounted the MAC solenoid. The SS lines are ultimately what pushed me towards this kit. With all the other heat protection in place, I have zero worries these will ever give me any issues.





Once the turbo was completely fitted with charge piping in place, I moved on to the huge ********. While it didn't look like there was nearly enough room, it snaked right into place. I added a nice layer of silicone as suggested by Payam and tightened everything down. I did have to bend the DOCRace heat shield slightly, but other wise it all fit together nicely. I even took further precautions for heat protection because of the close proximity of the ******** to the AC lines--moving it up slightly, wrapping everything in DEI sleeving, and cutting off & reusing the OEM outlet heat shielding as another barrier.







At this point, there were a lot of loose ends to button up, but things were coming together. I relocated the coolant tank with ease using the bracket, brass fittings, and heater hose supplied by ACF, but unfortunately the active steering reservoir is slightly larger with different angled hoses, so that, coupled with my charge pipe + BOV combination would not allow proper fitment. So I extended the lines using appropriate sized power steering hose, barbed fittings and clamps, welded the bracket to the factory strut bar, and gave it a fresh coat of paint.



The factory strut bars would be combined with the OEM BMW Performance aluminum strut bar. And I went ahead and picked up a used, thicker front Eibach front sway bar.



I didn't take many pictures of some of these steps under the car here because it was mostly reassembly of everything, but here are some stream of thought notes regarding the steps between getting the turbo and ******** mounted & addressing software in the next picture:
  • Fitting the active steering rack back in and getting all the electrical harnesses connected by myself was no fun. Neither was getting all the suspension components torqued back down.
  • The OEM mid-pipe mated up perfectly with the ACF ********.
  • I went as far as to installing all the plastic panels underneath except the main one under the engine (so I could check for leaks upon first start), before moving on to installing the Phoenix Race FMIC.
  • I also didn't take many pictures of this step, because I was beginning to get frustrated with the amount of plastic that had to be cut away. I ended up using an angle grinder, cutting wheel, tin snips, and reciprocating saw in very tight spaces and in very close proximity to the radiator & AC condenser to get the job done, and had to test fit everything over a dozen times to get things fitted properly, but finally got this monstrosity mounted.
  • It's huge, heavy, and has been proven to keep IAT's very much in check. For those worried about weight, I had the whole thing hanging by just the silicone couplers and tightened t-bolt clamps before fitting the two screws, and there was no way it was going anywhere.
  • I triple checked tightness proper fitment on all the t-bolt clamps holding on silicone couplers. The last thing I want is to get into boost for the first time and blow off an IC pipe.
  • I installed fresh NGK plugs at .022 gap, new Delphi coils, and switched from the RB external PCV with Mishimoto OCC to an RB PCV and cap for simplicity sake. Plus I have the proper tools and know-how to do walnut blasts whenever I need now.
  • I connected the OEM flapper valve to the BMS high side OCC, and then connected about 6 feet of heater hose to the outlet, and routed it underneath the car next to the fuel lines, which should help push these fumes far behind the car with the exhaust.
  • I added coolant (about a gallon), bled the system, topped off, bled the system again just to be safe, and topped off again.
  • I finished adding fluids: fresh Motul engine oil, power steering fluid, and windshield wiper fluid.
  • With a battery charger connected, I uploaded the ST JB4 firmware, and made the proper adjustments for my particular setup.
  • Now that the firmware was done, it was time to move on to the BMS ST E85 Twin Scroll BEF. I activated the cold start hoise reduction, "sport" coolant target, ADV o2 sensors installed, and a 950RPM idle to help reduce the noise of the SMFW.



Now was the moment I'd been waiting for. I disconnected the electrical connections of the injectors, primed the car and looked for leaks. Nothing. I then reconnected the electrical connections, got back in the car and fired it up. It immediately started and began idling normally. I hopped out of the car, and inspected for leaks up top as well as underneath. For the next half hour I left the car idling, looking for things out of the ordinary. Besides the minuscule amount of noise from the SMFW, everything seemed to be set up correctly. I let everything cool back down completely, added a bit more coolant to top off the system, and repeated the entire start + fully get up to temperature and check for leaks routine. Once I made sure no liquids or exhaust gasses were escaping, I noticed that, as expected, all the heat wrap had to burn off a layer of something, resulting in some smoke. Once that stopped, I cut the ignition off again, reattached the undercarriage plastic shielding, and installed the remaining engine bay components for a stunning final result.













Once EVERYTHING was back on the car, I gave it all another once over, and prepared for a first drive. At this point, my fiance had become quite tired of all the time I'd been spending across town working on this car over the past month and had expected me home hours ago, so basic functionality was all I'd be looking for. Plus I needed to break in the clutch for the next 500 or so miles. A few thoughts I had along my drive home:

The clutch and flywheel combination is silky. Rev matching and downshifting is much snappier, and easier IMO. The Spec 2+ feels pretty much indistinguishable from what the factory clutch felt like. Engagement is easy and predictable, although that may be a testament to my other transmission/shifter modifications. With a 950RPM idle, chatter is basically non existent. A small bit of NVH at low RPMS, like when not quite coming to a stop, and speeding up again, all while in second gear. Would more than likely be non-noticeable to an average passenger. If this combination can hold the power and last for a decent amount of time, I'll be very happy. I think I made the right decision with the steel MFactory SMFW and Spec Stage 2+ clutch.

The exhaust volume hasn't changed much out of boost, even with the much larger ********, but start dipping into boost at all, and prepare yourself for a real treat. The sound in comparison to the twin turbos is night and day, and it's not even close as to which I prefer. I can't wait for the first WOT pull to hear everything working in symphony. Normal city driving and highway driving result in a drone-free, very moderate tone. Downshift, and prepare for jaws to drop.

I never took the car above 5,000 or so RPM once it was up to temperature as I just rolled very easily into boost a few times in 3rd gear to make sure the boost wasn't unchecked. Despite installing the 11.6psi, wastegate spring pressure in map 1 would hit around 16psi and stick rock solid, which I've heard is somewhat normal when using Tial wastegates on our application. I'll wait on logs and some more drive time to make any comments on spool time, but let's just say I don't think this BB 6062 spools much slower than my stock twins with the wastegate rattle fix maximized, if it all.

Wastegate rattle is gone obviously, but more importantly, no smoke as I approach a stop. Two huge reasons why I wanted to make this upgrades in the first place.

I'll be back soon when I have a chance to put the car through its initial map 1 logging paces and work out some kinks with some more pictures/video. It was way too windy outside, the weather is still near freezing, and the sounds of a ST N54 car makes need to be captured properly so others can appreciate.


Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver ACF Top Mount Single Turbo Build Thread HERE
Reply With Quote
(#198)
Old
haydonbetz haydonbetz is offline
Junior Member
 
Posts: 56
Join Date: Jan 2016
Car: 2008 e92 335i, jb4 tune, bmw m performance exhuast, lux halo lights, BMS intake, h@r coilovers
Default Toque Specs - 03-14-2018, 06:56 AM

Congrats on such a beautiful build and great build thread. I was wondering where you got all the engine toque specs from?
Reply With Quote
(#199)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 528
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 03-15-2018, 09:20 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by haydonbetz
Congrats on such a beautiful build and great build thread. I was wondering where you got all the engine toque specs from?
Thanks man, and I appreciate you reading through everything. It's a very long read! A Bentley manual would have been useful, but most of the torque settings for everything involved with dropping the subframe and replacing the turbos are available online. The torque specs that I posted were from another DIY about replacing turbos on the N54. I also used the Budget Bimmers YouTube channel often and watched that DIY video a half dozen times for reference.


Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver ACF Top Mount Single Turbo Build Thread HERE
Reply With Quote
(#200)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 528
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 03-28-2018, 07:11 PM

It's been two weeks since I fired up the engine for the first time after installing the ST kit. Everything seemed to be going smoothly, but almost immediately I began getting a service engine soon light. When I ran the codes, they were pointing to the o2 sensors. This made little sense, as I'd invested quite a bit of money in a set of ADV o2 sensors. These supposedly lasted longer, and measured more precisely in a pre-turbo environment.



After further investigation, while monitoring trims and AFRs in banks 1 and 2, I found that prior to these codes being thrown, the fuel trims would get stuck at a reading of 25. This indicated that the car was going into open loop fueling. This would send AFRs out of whack, and eventually throw the codes seen above. Clear the codes with the JB4 Mobile app, and voila, trims were unstuck again for a few minutes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q2p24QPl7Ig

The majority of time this happened, it was when I was off throttle, in gear. Like clockwork, if I let off the throttle and coasted for more than 5 seconds or so, I could get the code to appear every time. It would also randomly appear, for no reason at all at various throttle positions.

I triple checked that all the sensors were in the right places, not damaged in any way, and the connectors were seated properly. I flashed different revisions of the ST hex hoping it was a tuning issue, but ultimately I ran out of options. After pulling out my hair for 14 days, I eventually bit the bullet and decided to order a set of NTK o2 sensors. Supposedly these last a bit longer than the OEM Bosch o2 sensors, but we shall see.



Fortunately on the ACF top mount kit, changing o2 sensors isn't too involved, but still something I never thought I'd be doing only a few weeks in to switching to a single turbo. This all after going out of my way to order the ADV o2 sensors so I wouldn't have to worry about these exact issues. Before getting the car in the air, I removed the cowl, engine cover, strut bar, and BMS shorty filter.



Then I had to get the car up on stands, remove some of the splash guards underneath to gain access where needed, and I proceeded to remove the 4 bolts holding the ACF ******** to OEM midpipe together. I eventually had to disconnect the two bolts connecting the OEM midpipe to the MadDad Whisper as well to gain enough clearance.



In order to access the rear pre-*** o2 sensor from above, the v-band clamp securing the ACF ******** to the exhaust housing of the turbo had to be loosened and pulled back.





And in order to access the front pre-*** o2 sensor from above, the compressor cover needs to be pulled forward. This consisted of loosening the top t-bolt clamp holding the cover to the charge pipe, and the 6 bolts holding the compressor cover to the center cartridge.





Using some patience, my full sized 22mm wrench, and 22mm wrench that I cut in half, I was able to get the ADV sensors out and the NTK o2 sensors in.

I carefully put everything back together, flashed back to the standard BMS ST TS E85 BEF with MHD, re-selected the JB4 o2 pressure compensation and reset on startup options, reset adaptations, and started the car. After verifying everything was back together properly, I took the car for a nice long drive, trying my hardest to recreate the conditions where fuel trims would get stuck, but they continued to read properly. No codes, and no fuel trim problems.

For the first time, I was able to stay in the throttle for a large part of 3rd gear, and my goodness. The sounds this car now creates are indescribable. Once I get the car dialed in on map 1 wastegate boost, which now seems to stick steady at 15psi after breaking in, I'll turn the boost up to map 2 levels and get some videos.


Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver ACF Top Mount Single Turbo Build Thread HERE
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump




vBulletin Skin developed by: vBStyles.com
Copyright © 2007 - 2017, N54tech.com