N54Tech.com - Your Source for International Turbo BMW Racing Discussion
(#176)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Junior Member
 
Posts: 441
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 09-11-2017, 11:21 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by dyezak
It'll probably be faster for you to pull the whole engine to install all that.
You aren't the first person I've heard this from. I will explore this route since I'm not too pressed on time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by suspenceful
Woo! I think you made the right choice. My 135i is currently a paperweight. Once I save up enough to get a used engine, I think I will tone back my horsepower goals. Although I have all the parts needed, I don't want to grenade another motor.

I look forward to you tackling this project. Be ready for curse words and dirty, bleeding hands. Like noted above, you might have a better time just dropping the engine and trans, or bringing it out from the front.
I believe so too. I was simply getting greedy for a few months considering how I use the car. I believe I'll be much happier with this setup overall. As I mentioned above, I might need to explore the engine dropping/pulling out the front option rather than dropping the subframe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShocknAwe
Very similar power goal wise to me, so I am eagerly anticipating your thoughts on the GCLite/550i/Luk combo.

What fuel are you going for?
I'll be sure to give back detailed feedback every step of the way. As far as fuel goes, I enjoy running E40 and my LPFP/HPFP seem to like it as well, so as long as my HPFP can handle the E40 ratio with the amount of air the GC Lites will be moving, that's probably what I'll stick with. Plus its easy to throw the exact same amounts of E85 and 93 octane in the tank and get pretty close to E40.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 135iam
Nice! I look forward to hearing your review.

Why did you go with the motive fuel rail over buying the complete setup from fuel-it?

I am installing the following in the next two weeks. Mfactory single mass flywheel, spec Stage 2+ clutch, RB next gen +, inlets, outlets.....but I havent made a decision on fueling yet. Planning to focus on getting tuned for 500whp on 93 octane first, wmi or PI may follow shortly after
I found the Motiv rail, injectors, etc. used at a decent price, so I picked that up separately. From there, I added the BMS controller and fuel line to work with my setup. I touched on it above, but that has all been sold. I'll be sticking with DI for the time being.


Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver Build Thread HERE
Reply With Quote
(#177)
Old
ianc ianc is offline
Junior Member
 
Posts: 50
Join Date: Jun 2016
Car: 135i
Default 09-12-2017, 11:04 PM

Everything looks gorgeous and I'm ordering bushels of pre-buttered popcorn and cases of beer to settle down and fully take in this extravaganza!

I have to say up front that I'm really happy you abandoned the port injection setup. If the engine can't protect itself by shutting off fuel flow when things are dicey, then things can get hairy and expensive real fast at high power levels. For a track monster and deep pockets fine, but keep it sane and semi-civilized for the DD; especially when you'll be hauling the SO around on occasion. My guess is that once you button this job up, you really won't want to be going there again for a long time. If ever...

Pulling the whole shebang sounds like the best plan to me, but do you need a lift for that? If one's convenient great, but the whole business will come out the front, no?

Best of luck and pulling for you!

ianc
Reply With Quote
(#178)
Old
Schläfer Schläfer is offline
Junior Member
 
Posts: 36
Join Date: Feb 2017
Car: '08 535xi
Default 09-13-2017, 02:52 PM

Which e40 flash are you running now?
Reply With Quote
(#179)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Junior Member
 
Posts: 441
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default 09-14-2017, 06:28 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ianc
Everything looks gorgeous and I'm ordering bushels of pre-buttered popcorn and cases of beer to settle down and fully take in this extravaganza!

I have to say up front that I'm really happy you abandoned the port injection setup. If the engine can't protect itself by shutting off fuel flow when things are dicey, then things can get hairy and expensive real fast at high power levels. For a track monster and deep pockets fine, but keep it sane and semi-civilized for the DD; especially when you'll be hauling the SO around on occasion. My guess is that once you button this job up, you really won't want to be going there again for a long time. If ever...

Pulling the whole shebang sounds like the best plan to me, but do you need a lift for that? If one's convenient great, but the whole business will come out the front, no?

Best of luck and pulling for you!

ianc
Agreed completely. I was getting greedy about numbers, but I'll be much happier with this setup on a day to day basis. As you mention, My fiance and I carpool together to work multiple times a week round trip, so this 1er has to adhere to the wolf in sheep's clothing persona with her spending so much time in the passenger seat.

The jackstands, front bumper off, engine/trans out of the front method is definitely the way I'm leaning. I still need to do considerable research on how to make that happen though, but it seems as if it would be most time effective as well.

The thought of being able to install turbos, *********, inlets, clutch/flywheel, clean the intake valves, replace oil pan gaskets with all the room in the world sounds like heaven in comparison to removing the transmission and subframe separately while trying to work in tight spaces.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Schläfer
Which e40 flash are you running now?
I ran the V5 and V7 E40 OTS flashes from MHD for a bit, but for the past few weeks I'm back to the BMS E85 BEF and its definitely the one I prefer the most for overall feel and drivability.


Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver Build Thread HERE

Last edited by chadillac2000; 09-14-2017 at 06:34 AM..
Reply With Quote
(#180)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Junior Member
 
Posts: 441
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default Yesterday, 01:00 PM

Haven't updated this thread in a while, so here goes:

11-05-2017: Since my last post, I've continued to make my 135i work hard nearly every single day. I've made this car live up to the road warrior name, putting nearly 700 miles on it each week and enjoying every second along the way. Each morning with the clutch in and a push of the ignition button, the engine fires right up with no hesitation, releases a quick roar, then quickly settles down to idle because of the Quiet Start mode embedded within the MHD tune. I continue to find this coupe practical, comfortable, quick as hell, and an absolute blast to drive through a number of different driving situations.

I know my driving experience would be greatly enhanced by installing the GC Lite and other mods I have sitting in my spare room, but I still haven't been able to pin down an exact time to start this tedious teardown. In the meantime, my mileage is continuously increasing and that means more maintenance. Not only was it time for an oil change with fresh Motul, but also time for a new set of NGK plugs as its been about 18,000 miles of E40 and 20psi since they were last changed.

Before we get to that, I wanted to share a few purchased I've been meaning to pull the trigger on. I've become less and less satisfied with the hodgepodge of different jacks and jack stands that I have access to at the shared garage I use, so I wanted to grab some new hardware that would be more suited for my setup.



For jack stands I went with Esco 10498 low-profile units with the included large circular rubber jack pads.



For the jack, I went with the Sunex 6602LP 2 Ton, Low Rider Service Jack, which I picked up off Amazon for $217.99. I chose this because of the 2.75" to 24" height range, which would allow me to use it on the 135i and my Cayenne. Regarding the turbocharger replacement that I'm about to undertake, this should allow me to get the car high enough off the ground to comfortably work for a week or two.



Aside from the extreme weight (close to 100 pounds), this jack is impressive and looks phenonemal. Unfortunately, it arrived with no upper handle. Because of the hassle of returning such a heavy item, Amazon instead gave me a 50% refund. I was able to easily replace the upper handle with one off an old jack laying around the garage.



The finishing touch for the Esco stands were these Pivot-Top posts made specifically for the BMW jack pad by Reverse Logic. Now I'll no longer need jack pad adapters or worrying about breaking the pads themselves by destroying them with y-shaped jack stands.





I was a little disappointed to see that the Sunex jack wasn't long enough to fully reach the middle jack point under the engine by itself, but it got impressively close considering this car is lowered with a front lip. Using a smaller jack on one of the front jack pads using an adapter would still be necessary to get the new Sunex jack deep enough under the front bonnet.







I was very satisfied to see the Pivot-Top posts slide smoothly into the jack pads. This height provided ample room for an oil change and the jack stands still have plenty of upward range; range that I'll utilize when swapping turbos.



Sticking to the 5,000 mile oil change interval I've been adhering to lately, the old Motul X-Cess 5W40 oil was drained and replaced with 7 quarts of new Motul X-Cess 5W40, a new Mann oil filter and o-rings, and both catch cans were emptied. Since I drive this car so often, it only takes a few weeks before my Mishimoto OCC + RB external PCV needs dumping. As expected, after emptying the can a few weeks ago, today it was half full again. After 10,000 miles I checked the BMS OCC to find less than a teaspoon of oil coating the inside. I may get rid of that OCC altogether when replacing turbos. After addressing oil concerns, I then turned to the ignition. Eventually the old NGK plugs were out and looked pretty good from front to back. This came as no surprise however, as they've had zero misfires over their life.



In addition to taking out the spark plugs, I also disconnected the injector electrical connections in preparation of performing a compression test--just to ease my mind about my smoking when coming to a stop. I'm fairly positive that the issue stems from leaking turbo seals, but I wanted confirmation there wasn't something more serious going on before I went through the trouble of upgrading to higher flowing turbochargers. For this, I utilized the OTC Deluxe Compression Kit. This was easy to use, had the correct insert, and worked perfectly.



With the engine warm, but not hot, I left the spark plugs out and one by one hand tightened the compression tester in cylinders 1-6. Each time I would go inside the car, depress the clutch, and let the car turn over 10 times. When it was all said and done, my 92,000 mile N54 passed with flying colors.













Afterwards, 6 new NGK plugs were installed and shouldn't need replacing until closer to 110,000 miles (or when I upgrade turbos), whichever comes first.

And while I reinstalled the stock coils with around 25,000 miles of use on them because they were working perfectly at current power levels, reinforcements have arrived for the increased power right around the corner. I'll probably hold on to these and just install everything all at once closer to Spring.



11-08-2017: Not a big update, but ordered a dedicated bracket directly from Mishimoto to secure my OCC connected to the external PCV. I ran it closer to the firewall next to the BMS OCC for a while, but eventually moved it closer to the front headlight. I'd rigged up my own homemade bracket, but liked Mishimoto's in-house polished design better. When installed as originally intended I had some interference with the front inlet, but flipped over and it works perfectly. It gives the can just enough clearance around my inlets, headlights and chargepipe to empty without messing with any of the screws or brackets. Looks loads better too.







12-09-2017: In other news, Asheville got its first snow of the winter months, around 8 inches or so. The 1er, still sleeping outside every night, took it like a champ. This isn't her first time being frozen in place until the snow melts.





Wheel arch shaped icicles.



12-29-2017: As my odometer rolled over 97,000 miles, yet another oil change was in order. It also gave me the opportunity to install the ECS billet oil filter cap I ordered recently. I admit, this was purely for looks. And eliminates one more specialty tool I have to keep in the toolbox. I've always used the BMS oil filter cap tool for removal, but no need with this.



New filter and o-rings in place.



And tightened down to 25 Nm.





Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver Build Thread HERE
Reply With Quote
(#181)
Old
chadillac2000's Avatar
chadillac2000 chadillac2000 is offline
Junior Member
 
Posts: 441
Join Date: Jul 2011
Car: 2008 535i
Default Yesterday, 01:01 PM

I apologize in advance for the long post, but I have some catching up to do as I’ve been absent recently! As some of you may know, a while back I picked up a complete set of brand new GC Lite turbos and accessories to replace my smoking stock twins. I had been meticulously planning the install, doing my research, and gathering all the parts needed to make this a smooth DIY. But life suddenly had other plans and I found myself having to put everything on hold indefinitely. These unforeseen circumstances prompted me to return everything I’d purchased over the last 6 months, as well as forfeit the $1,000 discount I’d won through VTT. I was also forced to consider the idea of selling the 135i all together; a car that I’d had all intentions of keeping forever. Over a matter of months though, things began to improve drastically, and not only was I able to keep the 1er as my daily; I was even able to treat her to that freshening up she deserved for all of her loyal hard work lately.

While it hasn’t been that long since I purchased this car back at the beginning of 2016, since then, I have spent a lot of seat time in this thing--to the tune of 50,000 miles in 24 months. Apart from the normal N54 problems, I was able to get out of ahead of most of the issues that typically arise, so ownership had been very enjoyable. More proof that if you take care of these cars with preventative action, they can be extremely reliable without breaking the bank; assuming you can do your own modifications, repairs, and maintenance of course.

It pained me to see my 1er’s mileage exceed 100,000 miles, but that’s certainly just a number in my car’s case though. So many systems have been refurbished and enhanced since taking ownership, that it certainly didn’t reflect its actual age. I finally had the car just where I wanted it on FBO + E85 power levels. It also looked and sounded sensational. It had been a while since I’d bought anything for the car aside from maintenance items and tooling over the past 6 months, so I thought a few upgrades were in order to commemorate the 100K milestone in the form of a few interior and drivability enhancements.

The first present came in the form of a mod that I’d been eyeing for the past year, the Ultimate Clutch Pedal. $295 is excessive for a pedal in my opinion, but it was hard to deny the overwhelming positive reviews I’d read from anyone that had decided to take the plunge and install one. Eventually I gave in and hit “add to cart”.



In addition to the pedal itself, it also came with a few other attachments and shoulder bolts for installation, including their own clutch stop that I’ll be replacing my BMS clutch stop with. The instructions made things simple.



The first step was to remove the bottom dash cover so we could gain access to the pedal fittings. Disconnecting the Bluetooth module from this panel was the most tedious part of the panel removal.



Working under the dash is among the most awkward places imaginable. It takes constant contortion of your body to make things works. Removing the stock clutch pedal was no different. But progressing through the easy-to-understand instructions sheet eventually left me looking like an automatic.



Because I’d installed the BMW Performance aluminum pedal set, I’d need to transfer that one over. Here’s a comparison of the UCP versus the OEM version:



Once I had the aluminum pedal secured to the UCP, all it took was securing the large shoulder bolt and replacing the clip that attaches the slave cylinder to the pedal. After researching as much as I could, I decided to forego the helper spring re-installation. The lack of a helper spring should result in a more linear clutch feel, but takes a bit more effort to engage. A few hours later and things were all reassembled. On to present number 2 of 3.



I loved the thick feel of the M-sport steering wheel, but it was lacking in a few areas; enough that some of other wheels had started to catch my eye despite the high cost. On mine, the perforated leather had become worn at the 7 o’clock position, and the more alcantara I added to the interior, the more I wanted. I wasn’t interested in the electronic readout on some of the higher priced BMW Performance wheels, so that left me with only a few options. Keeping with the BMW Performance theme, the full alcantara model with the yellow 12 o’clock stripe seemed fitting. I already had the OEM alcantara trim insert, so they would match up perfectly. The lack of a heated steering wheel that I’ve had in other vehicles meant that on Carolina winter mornings I was frequently forced to use gloves for the first 15 minutes of my morning commute until things warmed up, so hopefully that helps alleviate the need for those as well.



Removing the stock steering wheel was straightforward. First and most importantly, disconnect the battery. Insert a screwdriver on the slits found on the backside of the wheel, depress the spring clip, and pop out each side of the airbag.



Once the airbag is off, a few electrical connectors need to be disconnected, and then a single 16mm bolt before everything is free.



I swapped over the alcantara trim insert from the original steering wheel, and installed in reverse of removal. I have to admit, that ended up being way easier than I’d anticipated. At this point, I’d eliminated all the M themed components from the car aside from the ZHP weighted knob, something I was hesitant to remove as it held a nostalgic connection to my former E46 M3. I have strong feelings about that car, and running the same shift knob was my way of paying homage to one of my all time favorite vehicles. But my OCD took over and wanted uniformity. That meant a BMW Performance knob with alcantara accents was installed.





At this point the car was equipped with OEM BMW Performance alcantara boots, knobs, trim, and steering wheels. From a purely aesthetic standpoint, the improvement is undeniable.









Initial thoughts are all extremely positive. The steering wheel completely transformed the interior of the car. Grabbing this thing is pure bliss, and although I’ll have to use more care with how clean my hands are when driving, is well worth the enhanced look and feel. It also isn’t uncomfortably cold in the mornings when the temperatures have dropped below freezing the night before. The new knob sits slightly lower than before, and although it takes slightly more effort since it weighs less, fits in perfectly with my interior theme. The Ultimate Clutch Pedal was perhaps my favorite of all three. All the side to side slop has been eliminated. The lower pedal position and included clutch stop, when paired with the lack of a helper spring, just gives a much more precise, linear feel to engaging/releasing the clutch. Now I can immediately find the engagement point and let things smoothly set into motion, where as before with the helper spring, it was much more of a guessing game. I’m surprised removing the helper spring from the stock pedal isn’t done more often. Also, the overall range of pedal travel was nearly cut in half. It just gets I imagine this will help even more when I have a more aggressive clutch installed.



The steering wheel, shift knob and clutch pedal completely transformed the driving experience, but unfortunately did not solve my problem of the cloud of smoke that would envelope my car when coming to a complete stop in traffic that I’d been dealing with for the better part of a year now. At this point, I had a decision to make yet again, as well as some more maintenance items I’d need to address now that I’d crossed into six digit mileage. Should I go with OEM replacements for simplicity’s sake, take the trip back down the upgraded hybrids route, or opt for a well-put together single turbo kit? I eventually made a decision, but you’ll have to wait until later this week to find out.


Visit Chadillac2000's 2008 135i Road Warrior Daily Driver Build Thread HERE
Reply With Quote
(#182)
Old
ucsbwsr's Avatar
ucsbwsr ucsbwsr is offline
Senior Member
 
Posts: 669
Join Date: Sep 2013
Car: 535xi Wagon
Default Yesterday, 01:33 PM

Love seeing an update and love the quality parts used. #details


N54 Powered M5 Wagon:
- M5 Driveshaft, M5 LSD, M5 Axles, M5 Brakes, M5 Rear Suspension
- M5 Front End, M5 skirts, M5 Mirrors, M-Tech Rep Rear
- KW V3, RD Sport Sways, UR Strut Braces, Forgestar F14 SDC
- Manual Trans Swap, MFactory SMFW, Spec Stg 3+ Clutch, UUC SSK
- EOS Port Injection Manifold, Fuel-It: Stg 2 LPFP +Lines +Ethanol Sensor
- JB4, Hexon RR550s, Custom Inlets, AR ***, 3" Exhaust, VRSF 7" IC, ER CP, Tial BOV, RB Ext. PCV, BMS OCC
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump




vBulletin Skin developed by: vBStyles.com
Copyright © 2007 - 2017, N54tech.com